Dallas hospital insists Ebola victim had the best care 'regardless of nationality or ability to pay' after his family claimed he was treated badly because he was a 'poor black man'

Dallas hospital insists Ebola victim had the best care 'regardless of nationality or ability to pay' after his family claimed he was treated badly because he was a 'poor black man'

The hospital where Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan died strenuously defended his treatment on Thursday and said he was given the highest level of care 'regardless of nationality or ability to pay'.

The Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas was responding to claims from the 42-year-old Liberian's family that he was given substandard treatment because he was 'a poor black man'.

The hospital said Mr Duncan had been cared for by a team of over 50 doctors and nurses, 24 hours a day.

It said Mr Duncan was not given the experimental drug ZMapp because the manufacturer hasn't got any more stocks and he was not given a blood transfusion from an Ebola survivor because he was a different blood group.

Details of his care were released as Duncan's nephew launched a renewed attack on the Dallas hospital, claiming his uncle had received inferior treatment.

Josephus Weeks told MSNBC: 'He is a poor black man. He had a very deep accent coming from West Africa. I believe they [the hospital authorities] didn't believe he deserved the care that everyone else should get. And you don't treat people like that.'

 

However the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has highlighted their determined effort to treat Mr Duncan and offered sympathy to his family and friends.

It said: 'Mr. Duncan's physicians treated him with the most appropriate and available medical interventions, including the investigative antiviral drug Brincidofovir.

'After consulting with experts across the country, the CDC, and the FDA, the investigative drug was administered as soon as his physicians determined that his condition warranted it, and as soon as it could be obtained. Mr. Duncan was the first Ebola patient to receive this drug.

'The drug ZMapp was not administered to Mr Duncan because it was not available. According to the CDC and the drug manufacturer, it has not been available since August 12, 2014.

'Mr. Duncan did not receive the same type of serum transfusion as the patient in Nebraska because his blood type was not compatible with the serum donors.

 
 
Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are those of the writers and do not reflect those of Capitalbay. Capitalbay accepts no responsibility legal or otherwise for their accuracy of content. Please report any inappropriate content to us, and we will evaluate it as a matter of priority.
What's next
By Staff Kalem 10/10/2014 13:16:00