Mosul liberated but ISIS legacy remains

Bodies in the road: Chilling pictures inside the city show the bodies of dead ISIS soldiers lay rotting in the streets as vehicles swerve to avoid them. The corpses are eaten by wild dogs and picked at by chickens
  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT
  • Eastern Mosul is liberated from ISIS control after an offensive by special Iraqi forces began in November 
  • Bodies of dead ISIS soldiers killed by Iraqi troops have been left in the streets to rot and are eaten by dogs
  • Extremists who refused to surrender are killed, then dragged through the streets and are tied up to lampposts
  • Children in Mosul stopped attending school after teachers ordered them to go to ISIS-controlled mosques 
  • Given Kalashnikov printed textbooks and taught maths equations like 'one bomb + two bombs = three bombs'
  • Around the city walls remain daubed in ISIS propaganda with claims that the terror group will invade Rome 

These chilling pictures inside newly-liberated eastern Mosul show the bodies of dead ISIS fighters laying rotting in the streets. 

On the banks of the Tigris River, just 600 metres from active ISIS positions, waste water trickles around a militant's corpse, lying rotting in a sewage outlet. 

He was one of many killed by Iraq's Special Forces as they advanced through rural suburbs towards the riverbank, forcing ISIS fighters to flee by boat across the Tigris to western Mosul - the other half of the city still occupied by ISIS.

In a nearby field, a soldier points out chickens pecking over a bloated and bloodied ISIS soldier. 

'They are hungry because the farmers left when the fighting started and they have no food,' he said. 'But those chickens are eating ISIS and then someone will eat them. It's disgusting. I've stopped eating chicken.' 

Free of ISIS: Three women walk past a wall daubed in ISIS propaganda as they enjoy their first taste of freedom for two years after eastern Mosul was finally liberated from the terror terror group by Iraqi special forces

Free of ISIS: Three women walk past a wall daubed in ISIS propaganda as they enjoy their first taste of freedom for two years after eastern Mosul was finally liberated from the terror terror group by Iraqi special forces

Aftermath of extremism: ISIS graffiti is painted on walls and nurseries around the city brainwashing those living there and claiming the terror group will defeat its enemies

Aftermath of extremism: ISIS graffiti is painted on walls and nurseries around the city brainwashing those living there and claiming the terror group will defeat its enemies

Brainwashing: Textbook, pictured, that children used to learn in ISIS-controlled schools were printed with Kalashnikovs on every page. Pupils were taught maths with equations like 'one bullet plus two bullets equals three bullets, and one suicide bomber plus five suicide bombers equals six suicide bombers'.'

Brainwashing: Textbook, pictured, that children used to learn in ISIS-controlled schools were printed with Kalashnikovs on every page. Pupils were taught maths with equations like 'one bullet plus two bullets equals three bullets, and one suicide bomber plus five suicide bombers equals six suicide bombers'.'

Coming to Europe: Across Mosul, the legacy of ISIS' reign of terror is evident everywhere. ISIS murals are still daubed across walls, proclaiming that militants are heading to Rome and threatening locals with death if they didn't pay 'zakat', an Islamic tax intended for charities

Coming to Europe: Across Mosul, the legacy of ISIS' reign of terror is evident everywhere. ISIS murals are still daubed across walls, proclaiming that militants are heading to Rome and threatening locals with death if they didn't pay 'zakat', an Islamic tax intended for charities

Eaten by wild dogs: Across Mosul, the city's normally emaciated dogs are looking healthier as they eat corpses of ISIS fighters. In one district where many buildings have been demolished by coalition airstrikes, a litter of plump puppies waddle in the grounds of a bombed-out mosque, metres away from two decomposing corpses serving as their regular source of food

Eaten by wild dogs: Across Mosul, the city's normally emaciated dogs are looking healthier as they eat corpses of ISIS fighters. In one district where many buildings have been demolished by coalition airstrikes, a litter of plump puppies waddle in the grounds of a bombed-out mosque, metres away from two decomposing corpses serving as their regular source of food

Across the city, its normally emaciated wild dogs look healthier as they are living on a diet of dead extremists. 

In one district where many buildings were reduced to rubble by coalition airstrikes, a litter of plump puppies waddle around the grounds of a bombed-out mosque, metres from two decomposing corpses.

Torn-open wounds on the bodies show the puppies have been eating the head and face of one militant and the abdomen of the man next to him.

'Let the dogs eat them, we don't care. Actually, we feel quite happy when we see dogs eating terrorists,' said army soldier Khalid.

'This is a normal death for every terrorist who comes to Iraq - they will be eaten by dogs.' 

He insisted responsibility to remove the corpses is down to the council, rather than the army.

'They've been there over a week,' one resident told MailOnline. 'Their car was targeted by a helicopter, so they escaped and ran towards that mosque, but then the aircraft bombed it and killed them.'

Khalid claimed the mosque was being used as an ISIS base, where it was rumoured ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi had preached.

Decomposing corpse: Bodies are left in the street because the army claim their disposal is the responsibility of the council while the council insist troops should clear them. But soldier Khalid told MailOnline: 'Let the dogs eat them, we don't care. Actually, we feel quite happy when we see dogs eating terrorists. This is a normal death for every terrorist who comes to Iraq - they will be eaten by dogs.'

Decomposing corpse: Bodies are left in the street because the army claim their disposal is the responsibility of the council while the council insist troops should clear them. But soldier Khalid told MailOnline: 'Let the dogs eat them, we don't care. Actually, we feel quite happy when we see dogs eating terrorists. This is a normal death for every terrorist who comes to Iraq - they will be eaten by dogs.'

Left to rot in the street: Passers by walk past the remains of a shot ISIS soldier. Those living there believe their presence are a helpful reminder of the fate awaiting militants who are still active and have cut their hair and shaved their beards inorder to hide amongst civilians

Left to rot in the street: Passers by walk past the remains of a shot ISIS soldier. Those living there believe their presence are a helpful reminder of the fate awaiting militants who are still active and have cut their hair and shaved their beards inorder to hide amongst civilians

Decaying body: Iraqi soldier Khalid insisted responsibility to remove the corpses is down to the council, rather than the army. 'They've been there over a week,' one resident told MailOnline. 'Their car was targeted by a helicopter, so they escaped and ran towards that mosque, but then the aircraft bombed it and killed them.'

Decaying body: Iraqi soldier Khalid insisted responsibility to remove the corpses is down to the council, rather than the army. 'They've been there over a week,' one resident told MailOnline. 'Their car was targeted by a helicopter, so they escaped and ran towards that mosque, but then the aircraft bombed it and killed them.'

Warning: Another soldier, Ashraf, said leaving the bodies in the street served as a warning to ISIS fighters and supporters, who have many claim since the city's liberation, have shaved their beards and cut their hair to disguise themselves and are hiding amongst civilians

Another soldier, Ashraf, said leaving the bodies in the street served as a warning to ISIS fighters and supporters, who have many claim since the city's liberation, have shaved their beards and cut their hair to disguise themselves and are hiding amongst civilians. 

A number of rogue ISIS soldiers have been discovered hiding in underground tunnels and on rooftops in newly-liberated areas before they have been executed.

In another district, Federal Police Sergeant Mahmoud, 34, pointed at the dead body of a young man looking no older than 15 years old, too young to have even grown a proper beard, lying on the edge of a town square. 

'He killed a policeman,' explained Sergeant Mahmoud. 'A civilian reported that there was an ISIS fighter hiding on the roof of their house and, when a policeman went up there to investigate, the ISIS guy shot him in the chest and leg, killing him.'

Federal Police units, which are moving into positions behind the advancing Iraqi Army, to secure Mosul's newly-liberated areas, killed him.

His body was dragged through the streets and tied to a lamppost using pink plastic hose pipe with his feet bound together by blue twining.

Bloodthirty murals: Despite the Iraqi offensive on the city beginning in November, the people of eastern Mosul were only officially liberated last week. Reminders like this propaganda remains and is dotted all around the city

Bloodthirty murals: Despite the Iraqi offensive on the city beginning in November, the people of eastern Mosul were only officially liberated last week. Reminders like this propaganda remains and is dotted all around the city

Kalashikov textbooks: Children were taught at ISIS-controlled schools with machine guns printed on the pages. Children in the city stopped attending school when teachers made them go to radical mosques because they feared being brainwashed 

Kalashikov textbooks: Children were taught at ISIS-controlled schools with machine guns printed on the pages. Children in the city stopped attending school when teachers made them go to radical mosques because they feared being brainwashed 

Rogue fighters: A number of the last few remaining ISIS soldiers like the one pictured have been discovered hiding in underground tunnels and on rooftops in newly-liberated areas before they have been executed. Their bodies are then dragged through the streets and strung up to lampposts in public to warn those left the fate that awaits them

Rogue fighters: A number of the last few remaining ISIS soldiers like the one pictured have been discovered hiding in underground tunnels and on rooftops in newly-liberated areas before they have been executed. Their bodies are then dragged through the streets and strung up to lampposts in public to warn those left the fate that awaits them

Demolished: A bombed out building is reduced to rubble following an airstrike. Mosul will spend the coming months and years rebuilding after two years of rule at the hands of ISIS 

Demolished: A bombed out building is reduced to rubble following an airstrike. Mosul will spend the coming months and years rebuilding after two years of rule at the hands of ISIS 

'We dragged him here and hanged him from that post for a few hours, so everyone could see what happens to you if you are ISIS,' Sergeant Mahmoud said. 

'Maybe it seems weird but I see it as revenge because that's what ISIS themselves did to people in Mosul.' 

'What we did with the body is okay because any ISIS people still in hiding will know they should be scared, thinking the same thing could happen to them,' he added.

As Sergeant Mohmoud explains the barbaric torture of slain extremists, children a few years younger than the dead militant, play nearby with pieces of scrap metal. 

'He's a dirty man and he stinks,' said 13 year-old Ali, orphaned after ISIS killed his parents a year ago. 'I feel a bit sick when I look at him but he's an ISIS and ISIS want to destroy the world.'

Ali said his is looking forward to the city's schools reopening. In Mosul's ISIS-controlled schools children were taught using textbooks with a gun symbol printed on every page.  

Haram: Outside nursery schools and in a central Mosul amusement park, cartoon characters have their faces sprayed over viewed as haram and forbidden by ISIS, pictured

Haram: Outside nursery schools and in a central Mosul amusement park, cartoon characters have their faces sprayed over viewed as haram and forbidden by ISIS, pictured

An armed Iraqi soldier walks past an empty central Mosul fairground that was once thriving. A cartoon character on the fairground ride behind the soldier has had its face and hands covered because cartoons are banned by ISIS

An armed Iraqi soldier walks past an empty central Mosul fairground that was once thriving. A cartoon character on the fairground ride behind the soldier has had its face and hands covered because cartoons are banned by ISIS

Scrubbed out: The face of this cartoon character painted onto a wall outside a school has been painted over because illustrations such as these are viewed as haram and prohibited by the group

Scrubbed out: The face of this cartoon character painted onto a wall outside a school has been painted over because illustrations such as these are viewed as haram and prohibited by the group

'I hated school with ISIS,' explained 11-year-old Mohammed. 'They had their own school books which had a drawing of a Kalashnikov on every page, and they were full of pictures of RPGs and bombs.' 

Mohammed said many children stopped going when teachers pressured them to attend ISIS-run mosques after class.

Another boy, Ra'ad, 14, described how he and his friends could only endure chilling ISIS tuition for three days.

'On the first day, they gave us picture books for maths and the sums were: 'One bullet plus two bullets equals three bullets, and one suicide bomber plus five suicide bombers equals six suicide bombers',' he recalled. 

'On the second day we were shown a range of weapons. We were taught how to strip-down, clean and reassemble guns. Then they we were taught how to shoot.'

He added: 'On the third day, they brought dolls and knives and showed us how to cut the heads off the dolls. That was really awful, especially because, when we made fun of it and laughed at the dolls, they hit us. After that horrible day, we didn't go back to school again.'

Most of Mosul's children spent the last two and half years staying at home, playing in the street or working with their fathers. But even then, they were still not immune from the terrifying reign of ISIS. 

Abdul, 15, worked with his father selling cigarettes, a high-risk but lucrative illegal trade in Mosul. Across ISIS's self-proclaimed caliphate, smoking is banned and punishable by public lashings. 

'The first time they caught me, they whipped me 36 times with a cow's tail,' said Abdul. The second time, he and his father were thrown into jail. 'There, with my own eyes, I saw them pour fuel over one man and on the ground around him, before setting it alight,' he said. 'It was terrible. We could hear his screams as he was burning to death.'

Memories of the terror reign: An escaped cow wanders past an ISIS sign overlooking a main road in eastern Mosul

Memories of the terror reign: An escaped cow wanders past an ISIS sign overlooking a main road in eastern Mosul

Another ISIS signs that used to stand in the town have been torn down and discarded, pictured. Iraqi troops are planning a fresh offensive of the terror group's stronghold on the western side of the city over the Tigres River

Another ISIS signs that used to stand in the town have been torn down and discarded, pictured. Iraqi troops are planning a fresh offensive of the terror group's stronghold on the western side of the city over the Tigres River

Across Mosul, the legacy of ISIS' reign of terror is evident everywhere. ISIS murals are still daubed across walls, proclaiming that militants are heading to Rome and threatening locals with death if they didn't pay 'zakat', an Islamic tax intended for charities. 

Outside nursery schools and in a central Mosul amusement park, cartoon characters have their faces sprayed over viewed as haram and forbidden by ISIS.

Iraq's armed forces launched the offensive to retake Mosul in October and recently announced the liberation of the eastern side of the city. 

They are planning a fresh offensive to western Mosul, on the other bank of the Tigris River.

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By Mathias Dillion 01/31/2017 09:04:00